Dune Frank Herbert

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Auf der Zusammenhnge zu belasten.

Dune Frank Herbert

Before The Matrix, before Star Wars, before Enders Game and Neuromancer, there was Dune: winner of the prestigious Hugo and Nebula awards, and widely​. Der Wüstenplanet: Roman (German Edition) by [Frank Herbert, Ronald M. Kein Buch hat so stark fasziniert wie Frank Herberts DUNE. Read more. 7 people. Der erfolgreichste Science-Fiction-Roman aller Zeiten - jetzt neu übersetztTausende von Jahren in der Zukunft und eine fantastische Welt: Arrakis, der Wüstenplanet. Einzigartig, herrlich – und grausam. Und doch haben es die Menschen geschafft.

Dune Frank Herbert Navigationsmenü

Der erfolgreichste Science-Fiction-Roman aller Zeiten - jetzt neu übersetztTausende von Jahren in der Zukunft und eine fantastische Welt: Arrakis, der Wüstenplanet. Einzigartig, herrlich – und grausam. Und doch haben es die Menschen geschafft. Die ersten Dune-Romane wurden durch Frank Herbert verfasst. Nach dessen Tod setzen sein Sohn Brian Herbert und der. Dune | Herbert, Frank | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Der Kult-Roman zum Kino-Blockbuster Das atemberaubende Panorama unserer Zivilisation in ferner Zukunft - und eine Welt, die man nie vergisst: Arrakis, der. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Dune«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Der Gottkaiser des Wüstenplaneten; von Frank Herbert; (1); Buch; 9,99 € Dune ist eine bizarre bis groteske Welt, die mir deswegen sehr gut gefällt. weniger. Der Wüstenplanet: Roman (German Edition) by [Frank Herbert, Ronald M. Kein Buch hat so stark fasziniert wie Frank Herberts DUNE. Read more. 7 people.

Dune Frank Herbert

Der Kult-Roman zum Kino-Blockbuster Das atemberaubende Panorama unserer Zivilisation in ferner Zukunft - und eine Welt, die man nie vergisst: Arrakis, der. dune frank herbert deutsch. Der Wüstenplanet: Roman (German Edition) by [Frank Herbert, Ronald M. Kein Buch hat so stark fasziniert wie Frank Herberts DUNE. Read more. 7 people. Dune Frank Herbert

Dune Frank Herbert - Inhaltsverzeichnis

Leto erscheint gottgleich, allwissend, und kennt Vergangenheit wie Zukunft. Doch Leto ist kein Mensch mehr. Der Herr des Wüstenplaneten Paul Atreides, Messi Der Film Stream Retter des Wüstenplaneten, ist verschwunden. Einband Taschenbuch Seitenzahl Erscheinungsdatum Brian Herbert und Kevin J. Immer noch ruft mich die Wüste. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. In: luebbe. Neue Kräfte Penetration Angst Trailer German sich entwickelt, neue Technologen wurden entwickelt, und der Orden der Bene Gesserit, der seit Jahrtausenden über das genetische Erbe der Atreides wacht, sieht sich mit Mächten konfrontiert, wie es sie bisher nicht gab.

The sardonic is all that permits him to move within himself. Without this quality, even occasional greatness will destroy a man.

Understanding must move with the flow of the process, must join it and flow with it. You'll find me there, staring out at you! You fight when the necessity arises—no matter the mood!

Mood's a thing for cattle or making love or playing the baliset. It's not for fighting. But all of these things are as nothing Make that the science of your tradition!

But that only permitted other men with machines to enslave them. You can know it without fail because it awakens within you that sensation which tells you this is something you have always known.

Climb the mountain just a little bit to test that it's a mountain. From the top of the mountain, you cannot see the mountain.

People need hard times to develop psychic muscles. Frank Herbert. He was a man of many facets, of countless passageways that ran through an intricate mind.

His magnum opus is a reflection of this, a classic work that stands as one of the most complex, multi-layered novels ever written in any genre. Today the novel is more popular than ever, with new readers continually discovering it and telling their friends to pick up a copy.

It has been translated into dozens of languages and has sold almost 20 million copies. As a child growing up in Washington state, Frank Herbert was curious about everything.

He carried around a Boy Scout pack with books in it, and he was always reading. He loved Rover Boys adventures, as well as the stories of H.

In grade school he was the acknowledged authority on everything. Since there are no computers, the essential working of the galaxy is still medieval and feudal with heavy reliance on men and their dallying around.

Lots of thriller potential right there. Men with superhuman analytical abilities called Mentats have taken the place of Computers.

On the other hand, we have the Bene Gesserit , an ancient school of mental and physical training for female students it gives them superhuman intuitive powers who follow a selective breeding program which makes them feared and mistrusted through the Imperium.

Quantum physics anyone? The Kwisatz Haderach is the proposed solution to the male-female dichotomy, between the analytical and intuitive.

The plot of Dune is almost wholly set on the desert planet of Arrakis also referred to as Dune , an arid wasteland where water is so scarce that men have to wear stillsuits which recycle human moisture for further consumption.

Everything on the planet is permeated with the spice, the air, the sand, the food. Everybody on the planet is hopelessly addicted to the spice, their only hope for survival being their continued intake of the spice.

The Spacing Guild , the economic and trading monopolistic arm of the Galaxy badly needs the spice for interstellar transport. This is because their frigates travel faster than the speed of light and hence travel backward in time.

The spice is the only way they can look into the future and see their way ahead. How cool is that! All the powers on the Galaxy are out to mine the spice, braving the sandworms, their name merely an euphemism, for they are gigantic metre long creatures which always come digging through the sand whenever spice mining is undertook.

There exist on the planet, the kickass native desert tribal Fremen , whom the foreign powers look down with suspicion and disdain.

The Fremen ethos is one of survival and scarcity, driven by tribalism and egalitarianism. No more spoilers about this. Except that they value water to the extent that spitting on a person is the highest honour they can bestow upon him.

Our protagonists are the Atreides family, consisting of the Duke, his Bene Gesserit concubine Jessica and their son Paul, who have been entrusted the stewardship of Arrakis.

We discover the alien planet of Arrakis along with them, firstly with fear, suspicion and wonder and ultimately, love and respect.

The poor chap trips balls over the spice and has visions of black hordes pillaging and murdering around town bearing his flag and sees his dead body multiple times.

He is ruddy ruthlessness, he is virile villainy, he is truculent treachery. He executes the inept chess players in his employ which says oodles about his badassery and his fondness for cold-blooded logic.

He sees everything in simplistic chess terms. What is my best move? Is there anything I can do to completely squash his move?

Is there a tactic which leads to mate in three? Religion, politics, the dynamic nature of power, the effects of colonialism, our blatant destruction of our environment are themes which run parallel to the intensely exciting and labyrinthine plot.

He shows the paramount importance of myth making and religion for power to sustain over long periods of time.

Man, as a political animal is laid completely bare. Real life Now these are my thoughts about what Herbert could have meant to be Arrakis- It makes perfect sense.

Islamism in a nutshell. The spice, much desired by everyone, is the oil. Baron Vladmir Harkonnen is symblomatic of the wily Russians. The Desert foxes Fremen are representative of the native Saudi desert-dwelling Bedouin tribe who have a strongly tribe-oriented culture and undoubtedly value water in equal measure.

And the ultimate loser is the environment. Why do good books get over? It is also scary and prophetic. It is a reading experience that will leave you dreaming of the grave emptiness of Arrakis and make you wish you were there to brave it all in the privileged company of the noble Fremen.

Frank Herbert achieves the pinnacle of what a sci-fi author aspires to rise to; authentic world building. View all 45 comments.

I will admit there are some things that went over my head but for the most part I figured it out. I remember a billion and 65 years ago I watched the movie and was like what the?

Basically all I remember is Sting and sandworms. I would love to watch it again and see if I understand it more after reading the book.

I'm still not sure what all the spices were about on Arrakis. I keep thinking it's like their farming like we would farm corn or tobacco, etc.

I could be wrong and I didn't get the connection between the spice and the sandworms. Is it like a drug to them?

I did read in the back of the book that is was like a drug when taken in small quantities and really addictive when taken in large quantities and that Muad'Did felt his prophesies were because of the spice.

I liked Duke Leto and I hated that he was betrayed not long after they got to Arrakis. There is always some twat out there causing trouble.

I really enjoyed Paul's character and his mother Jessica. They seemed like really strong people and adapted very well in everything they were put through.

I didn't really pay too much attention to the other characters or I guess I should say I didn't have many thoughts about them.

With the exception of the ones that betrayed them. I really enjoyed when Paul and Jessica had to travel to get away from the evil Baron Harkonnen before they were killed too.

I don't know why, but I enjoyed their little journey. I think they were both great in their roles when they were found by the Freman and showed they were a force to be reckoned with.

Now maybe I'm getting this all wrong but I'm trying to tell it through the way I saw it in my mind. I don't understand how Paul's sister, Alia, was an abomination.

That one must have went over my head too. It might have had something to do with the poison Jessica took to become the Reverend Mother.

I would NOT was to live somewhere there was a water shortage. And the part where they were talking about selling foot water, I can't even.

Which basically means your stinky foot sweat! Overall I really liked the book. I enjoyed traipsing through this desert with Paul and his mother. Only in book form though, not in real life!

Since they are doing re-makes of about a million different movies, I wish they would re-make this one because I think it would be really awesome!

I would like to see this land come to life in today's time! I don't know if I'm going to continue with the series as I have heard this is the best one and the others get confusing.

But I would like to see how Paul is as a ruler and what all happens to them, or maybe not depending on what all happens.

Does anyone have a link of where to get that book or is it still available? View all 84 comments. No other single syllable means as much to the science fiction genre, a single word that conjures images of sandworms, spice wars, great battles between rival dynastic families and a massively detailed and intricately crafted universe.

No wonder this is widely regarded as not just a Science Fiction masterpiece, but a literary achievement as well. Like a study of Shakespeare, the reader finds that this is an archetype upon which many influences and imitators have based their works.

The comple Dune. The complexity and depth of the creation is staggering and I am continually astounded at the discipline with which Herbert must have focused his imagination.

This is the book upon which Herbert would base his greatest series and one that would outlive him as his son has continued to expand and add detail to the vast, immaculate tapestry woven by a true master of the genre.

Encapsulating political, economic, sociological, biological, cultural and dynastic themes, Frank Herbert has set a high standard for later practitioners.

From the perspective of having read his later 5 Dune sequels, I am astounded at the rich tapestry he has woven. Most impressive was his close omnipresence, analyzing the thoughts and minute actions and subtle nuances of his complicated dynamic interplay of characters.

The exhaustive training of the Bene Gesserit and the intricate relations of the Houses and the Guild would stand as a monumental benchmark for speculative fiction ever since.

This time around I found myself looking more closely at the Harkonnens and will likely read some of Brian Herbert's additions to his fathers great work.

This time around I noticed that all of the quotes that begin chapters are from Princess Irulan and I paid close attention to how Herbert crafted these interludes.

I also was drawn to the religious undertones that really began very early in the book and how Paul realized his gifts and was preparing for his role in the beginning chapters - all demonstrating Herbert's great narrative skill.

Finally, I became more aware of what a great character was Gurney Halleck. While the ghola of Duncan Idaho dominated the later books, Herbert's creation of Halleck was an enjoyable and thought provoking addition to this masterpiece.

View all 85 comments. If this is the gold standard against which all science fiction must measure and be judged, let's just blow our brains out right now and call it a day.

As far as I can tell, Dune largely inspires two points of view. One marvels at its historical importance and world-building unique, fascinating, complex, rich , and the other dislikes the stilted writing but does so apologetically because Frank Herbert couldn't help the fact that he wrote science fiction in the s and that Edward Said hadn't d If this is the gold standard against which all science fiction must measure and be judged, let's just blow our brains out right now and call it a day.

One marvels at its historical importance and world-building unique, fascinating, complex, rich , and the other dislikes the stilted writing but does so apologetically because Frank Herbert couldn't help the fact that he wrote science fiction in the s and that Edward Said hadn't done his thing yet.

Come on , people of the world. Linear models of progress don't apply to good writing. Frank Herbert can't write because he's a shitty writer, not because it was the s.

The dialogue is clunky and characters have endless internal monologues in italics that serve no purpose but to explain incredibly obvious plot points to the reader.

This is an embarrassingly novice mistake. The plot also lacks any element of surprise. Princess Irulan, oblivious to the concept of spoiler alerts, summarizes all major plot points in her historical vignettes which introduce every single chapter.

We can't wonder about whether and how Jesus Christ Paul will become the messiah of the people because the princess has already told us before we've begun the book.

We can't wonder about who the traitor in the Atreides house is because Princess Irulan's vignette is all like "Yueh! A million deaths were not enough for Yueh!

It is So. Half the words are lifted from Arabic and Arab Fremen culture is the result of a scavenger rampage through Islamic concepts, scraps of Buddhism, and Frank Hebert's Orientalist curiosities all cobbled together into a cringe-inducing whole.

The main subject of this book, the sand niggers Fremen, have been in the desert for thousands of years, border on religious fanaticism, and haven't changed a bit over time.

They pray salat, conserve water because hello, desert , and wait for their white savior Paul to bring them out into the light or into the shade, as it were.

They frequently declare Muslim-sounding things in bastardized Arabic and are very upset because the Imperial forces are preventing them from doing Haj.

It's unclear how the Imperial forces have blocked all outbound flights to Saudi Arabia, but we'll take it on faith. There was a jihad situation, like, hundreds of years ago but it was apparently a jihad against computers?

I don't know. The ragheads Fremen also do this thing where two men will fight to the death and the winner will take the dead man's woman as his wife or his servant.

Given the history of the U. For a woman, the situation is reversed … The greatest peril to the Giver is the force that takes.

The greatest peril to the Taker is the force that gives. Mighty penis does the thrusting action. Woman has the sacred hole. Sacred hole is warm and open for mighty penis penetration.

Thanks for clearing that up, Frank. Male and female characters in this book align nicely with Frank's pole-in-hole view of the world.

The men do the war because the penis. The women do the manipulation and mind control because the vagina.

They are either wives or concubines, and having children is of utmost important. Man and his woman sometimes have tender conversations about all of this.

Observe: "[Paul] began tightening his still suit. Anyway, let's talk some more about Paul, our white messiah. When he's taking a break from tilling his fields, he's busy being a cartoon hero.

He has no flaws. Like, none. He sees everything, understands everything, knows the future, and every word out of his mouth is prophetic and vaguely Shakespearean.

This is the kind of shit he says: [Re. Sit down and shut the fuck up. Nobody cares. Opposite the cartoon hero is the cartoon villain.

He's really, really evil. He wakes up evil, goes to bed evil, and all the time in the middle, he has evil conversations and evil thoughts.

Many of his evil thoughts are in italics so we know EXACTLY where the story is headed because plot twists are also evil and will not be tolerated.

Please note, he is also fat as fuck and eats a lot. Also, he's a big homo. And the homo's a pedo. I really have nothing more to say.

I AM glad I took the time to wade through this shitstorm of misogyny and orientalism. You can't read sci-fi and not have read Dune.

I always suspected I might hate it, but at least now I have proof. Luke Thank you for taking the words out of my mouth.

Oct 27, PM. I completely forgot about the pretentious reviews, thank you for reminding me so that I could imm Good God, now I remember why I uninstalled this app.

I completely forgot about the pretentious reviews, thank you for reminding me so that I could immediately uninstall. They hated it before even opening the first page.

This person is the personification of The Young Turks. A toxic cesspool of sin and misery. As with most things that are universally worshipped by some and bitterly hated by others, the true quality is somewhere in the middle.

Not a glowing, flawless masterpiece as some would say and not a worthless one-star, derivative shitstorm like Jay screams it is.

Most things are more than the sum of their parts. Read the book if you want to. Jun 01, J. People often forget that this series is what innovated our modern concept of science fiction up until Neuromancer and The Martix, at least.

Dune took the Space Opera and asked if it might be more than spandex, dildo-shaped rockets, and scantily-clad green women. Herbert created a vast and complex system of ancient spatial politics and peoples, then set them at one another's throats over land, money, and drugs.

Dune is often said to relate to Sci Fi in the same way that Tolkien relates to Fantas People often forget that this series is what innovated our modern concept of science fiction up until Neuromancer and The Martix, at least.

Dune is often said to relate to Sci Fi in the same way that Tolkien relates to Fantasy. I'd say that, as far as paradigm shift, this is widely true.

Both entered genres generally filled with the odd, childish, and ridiculous and injected a literary sensibility which affected all subsequent authors.

Few will challenge the importance of Star Wars' effect on film and storytelling in general, but without Dune, there would be no Star Wars.

It is unfortunate that Lucas seems to have forgotten in these later years that his best genius was pilfered from Herbert, Campbell, and Kurosawa.

Though I have heard that the later books do not capture the same eclectic energy as the first, Dune itself is simply one of the most original and unusual pieces of Sci Fi ever written.

Read it, Starship Troopers, Ringworld, Neuromancer, and Snowcrash and you'll know everything you need to about Sci Fi: that you want more. View all 39 comments.

Shelves: transhumanism , sci-fi , space-opera , top-ten-w-cheats , fanboy-goes-squee , worldbuilding-sf , top-one-hundred. Number I shiver when Jessica consoles Chani.

I'm awestruck by the peaks and troughs of time, free-will, and the weakness in Paul even as he heroically strives against the evil that is about to be unleashed upon the universe.

Easily the number one book I've ever read. It's not just science fiction. It transcends science fiction, as a fascinating discussion of free-will versus inevitability.

Can the Jihad be denied? Can Paul ever really avoid his own death, despite seeing every time-line play out with him as the butt of every cosmic joke?

Can even cruelty or mercy even remain comprehensible after such knowledge? Yes, I think this work outdoes Nietzsche.

It certainly does a great job of making us care about the question. Is this all? Is this just a work that pays great justice to philosophy of action and inaction?

Or is the novel merely a clever play at turning the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle into the physical embodiment of a man?

It is that, of course. The Kwisatz Haderach can be many places at once, and he can be both alive and dead at the same time just like that certain cat.

Is the novel a coming of age tale, first set as a mirror against his father Leto, only then to mirror the whole universe that had just turned against him?

Yes, of course. He was, after all, both the product of all his upbringing and his genes, embodying the question of nature versus nurture.

He was taught within many schools of martial arts and assassins, as well as training the mind in both the schools of the Mentats with their pure logic and that of the mystics, the Bene Gesserit, that allows complete control over the body down to the cellular level.

And if this training wasn't enough, he was deeply schooled in politics, leadership, and the meaning of loyalty.

The boy was raised right. Of course, that is nothing without ninety generations of genetic bloodline tampering from the Bene Gesserit, right?

To become the fulcrum between cellular memory, tapping the minds and lives of all your genetic ancestors as well as tapping the ability to fold time and space, to become the eye of a storm of time.

What a damn brilliant setup for one tiny character, no? His training links to the unlocking of his genes and to the life-extending and enveloping spice, Melange, to make him not merely aware of time in a theoretical sense, but eventually to be unable to discern what was in the past, the present, or the future.

Here's a true Super-Man, well beyond Nietzsche. And don't believe for one second that this serious discussion about what would make a superior man makes for dull reading.

We've got PLOT that's probably some of the most exciting and visceral in all of literature, driving us right into the web of intrigue, vengeance, treachery, and galactic politics.

To quote the text, we've got "Plans within Plans," and it hardly stops there. We know the House Atreides is falling into a trap laid by the Emperor and House Harkonnen, and yet free-will and pride prevents any chance to avoid it.

The setup is brilliant and extremely political, giving us character sketches of some of the most brilliant and memorable characters of all time.

Duke Leto, the Red Duke, the most honorable and beloved leader. Duncan Idaho, the emotional and intuitive hero. Gurney Halleck, archetypal loyalist and troubadour.

Lady Jessica, the woman who ought to have had all honor in life, but was unjustly reviled and set aside for political necessity. Chani being both her mirror and her eventual glory.

And of course, my favorite character of all time, Paul Muad'dib Atreides, the one that would prevent the greater evils he foresaw, and went to enormous lengths and sacrifice to achieve, but who eventually failed in his task because even a god cannot overcome destiny.

Or the will of so many minds set as one. So damn brilliant. Frank Herbert spent five years writing this treasure, working and reworking it until he published it at age None of his other works come close to this masterpiece, and there's little wonder.

It was birthed, fully-formed, like Athena from Zeus's head, with enormous forethought and care. The worldbuilding was just as carefully formed, from the ecology of Arrakis and the life-cycles of the sandworms, to the history and the creation of the Fremen from their mild beginnings as Zensunni Wanderers, adherents to the Orange Catholic Bible, to their history of oppression so like those of those who are Jewish, to their settling and hardening of their bodies and souls in the wastes of Arrakis, also just like the Jewish who carved out a place for themselves in Israel.

Current politics aside, this was a very potent idea before when Herbert wrote this, and indeed, the core is still just as powerful when you turn it back to Muslims.

The Galactic culture is rich and detailed. The CHOAM economic consortium, with their monopoly on space travel and their need for the Spice to allow them to see a short period into the future to plot a safe course before folding space.

The Empire is caught on a knife's edge between a single power and every other House who sit in the possibility of putting aside all their squabbles for the sole purpose of checking the Emperor, if they so desired.

And Duke Atreides was such a possible popular leader among all the Great Houses, which was the primary reason the Emperor wanted him dead.

And of course, we have our Villains. The Baron Harkonnen has always been a crowd pleaser. Brilliant in his own right, devious and able to corrupt anyone with just the right sorts of pressure, including a certain absolutely trustworthy doctor we might mention.

The Tooth! Feyd Rautha Harkonnen is especially interesting for the question of nature versus nurture. The Bene Gesserit had intended him to mate with Paul, who should have been Leto and Jessica's daughter, and that offspring should have been the cumulation of ninety years of a breeding experiment to recreate the Kwisatz Haderach which had come about almost by accident during the Butlerian Jihad in the deep past, to overthrow the AI overlords.

He was practically Paul's genetic twin, or at least, his potential to be the "One who can be many places at once" was on par with Paul.

But instead of fulfilling the kind of destiny that we get with Paul, we see him grow up under the auspices of his Uncle the Baron, becoming as cruel and devious as he was deadly.

He was the argument of nurture in the conversation, of course, and having so very little of it eventually cost him his life. I often wonder about the directions that Dune could have taken, all those little paths in time and circumstance that could have been.

What if Feyd had been brought to Arrakis earlier and overwhelmed with Spice the way that Paul had? Sure, he wouldn't have been able to convert the unconscious changes into conscious manipulation, but he might have had enough glimpses of the future, the way that the Fremen did, to have given him the edge he would have needed to kill Paul.

And then there's a relatively minor character, Hasimir Fenring, the Emperor's personal assassin, who was nearly the Kwisatz Haderach, himself.

Unable to breed true, he was still potent enough to be completely hidden to Paul's time-sight in the same way that Paul was hidden from the Spacing Guild's weaker time-sight.

His training as a skilled killer was also superior to Paul. He was, by all the hints and tricks in the tale, Paul's perfect downfall. It always gives me shivers to think about, and it was only in a single instant of both recognition and pity from Paul that stayed Fenring from killing our hero.

It was just a moment of whim. The setup was gorgeous. Paul's pity, had it been missing at his moment of greatest triumph over the Emperor, would have meant Paul's assured death.

I still wonder, to this day, what stayed Frank Herbert's hand from killing his most wonderful darling.

We knew the pressure of religion and politics was going to have its way upon all the oppressed peoples of Dune. The return of a monstrous religious Jihad was going to happen one way or another, sweeping across the galaxy and toppling the Empire, regardless of Paul's frantic plans and desires.

Paul's own death would only mean a higher level of fanaticism, and Frank Herbert's warning against unreasoning devotion would have been made even clearer with Paul's death.

Perhaps it was pity that stayed his hand. Who are we to say who lives and who dies? If you really think this review is overlong, then I apologize, but please understand that I could absolutely go on and on much longer than this.

It is a symptom of my devotion to this most brilliant of all tales. And yes, it still holds up very, very well after twelve reads. I am quite shocked and amazed.

View all 37 comments. Oct 03, carol. Shelves: nebula , hugo , classic , awards , sci-fi. I blame the movie. I never did pick up the classic sci-fi book, assuming the commentary heard abou I blame the movie.

I never did pick up the classic sci-fi book, assuming the commentary heard about the movie applied to the book.

All that changed when I broke my finger and found myself with a lot of extra time on my hands groan.

Besides, sandworms. It begins with the Atreides family preparing to shift their holding from their current home to the planet of Arrakis.

The Emperor has given the Atreides the territory and trade on the planet of Arrakis, formerly under control of their enemies, the Harkonnen.

The planet Arrakis is hot, arid and generally hostile to life. There is, however, a small population of native, fierce Freman who have managed to build an existence in the desert.

Paul Atreides is the young heir of the family, and mystical testing reveals he might be the one prophesied. Paul undergroes a rapid growth curve, facilitated by his teacher Dr.

But it is in the desert that Paul will discover his strength as well as his new people. Seriously, now. Honestly, I have to wonder how much of this like is generational.

If Sanderson or Rothfuss wrote this book, two chapters in Dune would have made a whole book, and while detail may have been added, it likely would have made for a book as slow as the movie.

I liked the scope of Dune, and that there is a resolution to the initial conflict. On the downside, it could have perhaps used a bit more transitions, particularly near the end when months at a time are skipped.

Writing was solid; nothing really stood out, but it told the story well. And gay? World-building is fun, but standard desert.

I love a good hero. Ok, my only reference for Dune was the movie with Kyle MacLachlan. And, honestly, it was the main reason I've always wanted to read this book.

Ohmygod look what that fake-looking piece of plastic shit is doing to poor MacLachlan's nose? How was he even able to act with that thing pushing his nostrils to the side of his face?

I can't stop looking at it! I remember loving that movie when I was young. I honestly didn't remember much about it other than it was sorta weird, there wer Ok, my only reference for Dune was the movie with Kyle MacLachlan.

I honestly didn't remember much about it other than it was sorta weird, there were giant worms, a bunch of people had glowing blue eyes, and Sting was in it.

After listening to this audiobook, I decided to rewatch the movie and relive the good times. Just wow.

What in the holy hell did I just watch? Because whatever it was, it certainly didn't have much to do with the actual book.

There were some fucking weird changes that they made to the movie that really didn't do anything for the plot. Like that gross dude with the shit in his face that flew around in that goofy air suit?

In the book, he's just a fat dude! And that thing they do where they all have drain plugs attached to their hearts?

Not in the book, either! Blowing shit up with their voice guns? Bald Bene Gesserits? Bugs with butthole mouths? Mentat's with clip-on eyebrows who drink juice that gives them herpes lips?

Captain Jean-Luc Picard going into battle with a pug? Fuck no! The list goes on and on Not that it should matter. But it does! Because I was expecting something realllyreallyreally different, and if you go into this like me you may end up Having said that, I think the book was definitely better.

There was no reason for ass-mouth monsters or oily rock stars in weird rubber underwear. It just makes a lot more sense the way Herbert wrote it.

It's a magic is science tale set in space with an incredibly interesting look at how politics and religion can hold hands with each other and make war babies.

I can see why people rave about it. It's honestly an incredibly insightful novel. You know, if you're into that sort of thing A little dense , but worth it.

But dense. That's worth saying twice because this thing is massive and you may get lost in it if giant word monsters aren't your jam when it comes to reading.

View all 97 comments. I could never give Dune five stars because I really struggled to get into the novel in the beginning.

It has taken me almost two months to read. This, for me, is a very long time to spend on a book. It took me so long to read because I found the writing style incredibly frustrating.

I had to read whole chapters again so I could get the gist of the plot. I found this very annoying; however, I persevered over my initial despondency towards the writing, and plodded on through the book.

Indeed, the story is fantastic, but the writing will always remain unbearable for me. A truly brilliant plot Dune is to science fiction what The Lord of the Rings is to high fantasy; it is the novel that officially, and unarguably, defines the genre.

The story begins with the house of Atreides accepting the Dukedom of the planet Dune. The former Baron has been ousted by the Emperor, and is no longer of consequence.

Well, that is how it initially appears. Very early on it revealed that the whole thing is a political ploy to bring the house of Atreides to its knees.

The Baron lies in wait, and is ready to strike against the new, and benevolent, approach the Duke uses on the Fremen. The Fremen are the natives of the dessert planet; thus, they know how to survive its harshness above all others.

They do this through their frugal approach to water. They value it above all else, and will never waste a drop in earnest.

The Baron Harkonnen, as a chide against the natives, squanders water in the cruellest ways. He, and his dinner guests, throw cups of water on the floor of the dinner hall; it was his tradition.

The wasted water was soaked up with towels, which the Baron allowed the Fremen to suck the water out of.

The problem Animie4you that he does both, often times for the same Jasmin Bhasin in the same paragraph. Buddy re-read with Athena! The Baron Harkonnen is similarly corrupt, materially indulgent, and a sexual degenerate. Due to the similarities between some of Herbert's terms and Dessau Kino and actual words and concepts in the Arabic languageas well as the series' " Islamic undertones " and themes, a Middle-Eastern influence on Herbert's works has been noted repeatedly. It was birthed, fully-formed, like Athena from Zeus's head, with enormous forethought and care. Even the political intrigue Herbert tries Gomorrha Staffel 3 Stream Kinox fall back on was overdone in the Spy genre decades before he started this book.

More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Dune Dune, 1. There's a characteristically witty essay by Borges about a man who rewrites Don Quixote , many centuries after Cervantes.

He publishes a novel with the same title, containing the same words in the same order. But, as Borges shows you, the different cultural context means it's a completely new book!

What was once trite and commonplace is now daring and new, and vice versa. It just happens to look like Cervantes's masterpiece.

Similarly, imagine the man who was brave or stupid enough to rewrite Dune There's a characteristically witty essay by Borges about a man who rewrites Don Quixote , many centuries after Cervantes.

Similarly, imagine the man who was brave or stupid enough to rewrite Dune in the early 21st century.

Like many people who grew up in the 60s and 70s, I read the book in my early teens. What an amazing story! Those kick-ass Fremen! All those cool, weird-sounding names and expressions they use!

They even have a useful glossary in the back. The disgusting, corrupt, slimy Harkonnens - don't you just love to hate them!

When former-aristo-turned-desert-guerilla-fighter Paul Muad'Dib rides in on a sandworm at the end to fight the evil Baron and his vicious, cruel nephew, of course you're cheering for him.

Who the hell wouldn't be? So that was the Dune we know and love, but the man who rewrote it now would get a rather different reception. Oh my God! These Fremen, who obviously speak Arabic , live on a desert planet which supplies the Universe with melange, a commodity essential to the Galactic economy, and in particular to transport.

Not a very subtle way to say "oil"! They are tough, uncompromising fighters, who are quite happy to use suicide bombing as a tactic.

They're led by a charismatic former rich kid OK, we get who you mean , who inspires them to rise up against the corrupt, degenerate Or only the US?

And who is Baron Harkonnen intended to be? I'm racking my brains Dubya doesn't quite seem to fit, but surely he means someone? Unless, of course, he's just a generic stereotype who stands for the immoral, sexually obsessed West.

This is frightening. What did we do to make Frank al-Herbert hate us so much? You'd have people, not even necessarily right-wingers, appearing on TV to say that the book was dangerous, and should be banned: at the very least, it incites racial hatred, and openly encourages terrorism.

But translations would sell brilliantly in Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, and a bad movie version would soon be made in Turkey.

I honestly don't think Herbert meant any of that; but today, it's almost impossible not to wonder. If anyone reading this review is planning to rewrite The Tale of Benjamin Bunny , you'd better make sure you get your timing right.

Who knows how it will be interpreted five years from now? View all comments. Andres Madero Can someone explain the charismatic former rich kid reference?

Please Jun 29, PM. Jones now and Harkonnen reminds me of someone else Trying put my finger on No good. Never mind.

Great point well made: literary intent is, now and Harkonnen reminds me of someone else Great point well made: literary intent is, like beauty, all in the eye of the beholder.

No one should argue the importance Dune. It laid the foundations for a great deal of the themes and constructs in modern science fiction.

Unfortunately, just like them, he's quite dated, and his books can be a labor to read. One thing he maintained from old science fiction was prim and scientific dialogue that no one would ever actually speak.

I've known many scientists, and they don't talk like this. You're not going No one should argue the importance Dune. You're not going to convince me a child does.

The stuffy dialogue is inserted into even stuffier narrative, until it feels like nothing is organic about Herbert's prose. This is a terrible tragedy when you've got a world that he put so much effort into building - and it is an amazing feat of world-building, technically interplanetary building.

But unlike J. Tolkien, who he is so frequently compared to, Herbert didn't make sure to include a great story in his world. Instead he included a story that frequently illustrated how clunky an artificial world can be, even if it's lovingly crafted.

I struggled to attach or find interest in anyone, yet they're more archetypes than human beings, whose logic races past modern skepticism and whose dialogue is cloyingly artificial, the way people cared for the Hobbits, Dwarves and Rangers.

In his world-building, Tolkien at least saved himself from being dated by antedating himself, and even with his illuminated prose, wrought more characteristics in just one protagonist than all of Dune 's cast.

Even the political intrigue Herbert tries to fall back on was overdone in the Spy genre decades before he started this book. All fans of the "Genre" genres should appreciate Herbert's massive contributions, but they shouldn't pretend to enjoy the books if they don't, and they should be wary of certain pitfalls typical of science fiction that survived into his landmark work.

Lex Yeah looks about right Oct 26, PM. Sean Yes to all of this. Oct 29, PM. Sorry I don't get it. I was able to finish it by listening to the audiobook but I was bored throughout the whole 21h.

So many descriptions And let's not even mention how many times I laughed at the main female character being called Jessica. I'm sure I'll get plenty of comments telling me it's a classic and it brought so much to the genre At the end of the day, my rating is always based on my enjoyment.

Siyeon Crews I'm glad I wasn't the only one who felt the same way about this. In my head, the purpose of this review is very clear.

It is to convince YOU to read this book. Yes, you! Waste time no more. Go grab a copy. Machiavellian intrigue, mythology, religion, politics, imperialism, environmentalism, the nature of power.

All this set in a mind-boggling, frighteningly original world which Herbert ominously terms as an "effort at prediction".

Dune had me hooked! First impression The very first stirring I felt upon opening the yellowed pages of Dune was that of stumbling upo In my head, the purpose of this review is very clear.

First impression The very first stirring I felt upon opening the yellowed pages of Dune was that of stumbling upon an English translation of an ancient Arabic manuscript of undeniable power and potence which had an epic story to narrate.

The tone was umistakably sombre and I realized Herbert was not here to merely entertain me, he was here to make me part of the legend of Muad'Dib.

It was intriguing and challenging and heck, since I live for challenges I decided to take this one up too, gladly. The challenge was the complexity and depth of the plot, which left me perplexed, in the beginning.

I knew there were dialogues which meant much more than their superficial meaning and was unable to grasp at it.

I felt a yawning chasm between Herbert's vision and my limited understanding of it. However, of course, I plodded on and could feel the gap closing in with every page much to my joy and relief.

The Foreword "To the people whose labours go beyond ideas into the realm of 'real materials'- to the dry-land ecologists, wherever they may be, in whatever time they work, this effort at prediction is dedicated in humility and admiration.

This is a serious effort at predicting how our world is going to look two thousand years from now and by God, it's a bloody good and detailed prediction.

However, the real merit in this effort lies in the commentary on our lives in the present. Why Frank Herbert is a genius The setting of the book is arid futuristic.

The issues he tackles are as modern as the colour television. Herbert's genius manifests itself in his ability to combine the past, the present and the future in one sweeping elegant move called Dune.

Plot and Setting Dune is set in a futuristic technologically advanced world which after the Butlerian Jihad the bloody war between Man and Machines has eliminated all computers and passed a decree declaring "Thou shalt not make a machine in the likeness of a man's mind".

Since there are no computers, the essential working of the galaxy is still medieval and feudal with heavy reliance on men and their dallying around.

Lots of thriller potential right there. Men with superhuman analytical abilities called Mentats have taken the place of Computers.

On the other hand, we have the Bene Gesserit , an ancient school of mental and physical training for female students it gives them superhuman intuitive powers who follow a selective breeding program which makes them feared and mistrusted through the Imperium.

Quantum physics anyone? The Kwisatz Haderach is the proposed solution to the male-female dichotomy, between the analytical and intuitive.

The plot of Dune is almost wholly set on the desert planet of Arrakis also referred to as Dune , an arid wasteland where water is so scarce that men have to wear stillsuits which recycle human moisture for further consumption.

Everything on the planet is permeated with the spice, the air, the sand, the food. Everybody on the planet is hopelessly addicted to the spice, their only hope for survival being their continued intake of the spice.

The Spacing Guild , the economic and trading monopolistic arm of the Galaxy badly needs the spice for interstellar transport.

This is because their frigates travel faster than the speed of light and hence travel backward in time. The spice is the only way they can look into the future and see their way ahead.

How cool is that! All the powers on the Galaxy are out to mine the spice, braving the sandworms, their name merely an euphemism, for they are gigantic metre long creatures which always come digging through the sand whenever spice mining is undertook.

There exist on the planet, the kickass native desert tribal Fremen , whom the foreign powers look down with suspicion and disdain.

The Fremen ethos is one of survival and scarcity, driven by tribalism and egalitarianism. No more spoilers about this.

Except that they value water to the extent that spitting on a person is the highest honour they can bestow upon him.

Our protagonists are the Atreides family, consisting of the Duke, his Bene Gesserit concubine Jessica and their son Paul, who have been entrusted the stewardship of Arrakis.

We discover the alien planet of Arrakis along with them, firstly with fear, suspicion and wonder and ultimately, love and respect. The poor chap trips balls over the spice and has visions of black hordes pillaging and murdering around town bearing his flag and sees his dead body multiple times.

He is ruddy ruthlessness, he is virile villainy, he is truculent treachery. He executes the inept chess players in his employ which says oodles about his badassery and his fondness for cold-blooded logic.

He sees everything in simplistic chess terms. What is my best move? Is there anything I can do to completely squash his move?

Is there a tactic which leads to mate in three? Religion, politics, the dynamic nature of power, the effects of colonialism, our blatant destruction of our environment are themes which run parallel to the intensely exciting and labyrinthine plot.

He shows the paramount importance of myth making and religion for power to sustain over long periods of time. Man, as a political animal is laid completely bare.

Real life Now these are my thoughts about what Herbert could have meant to be Arrakis- It makes perfect sense. Islamism in a nutshell.

The spice, much desired by everyone, is the oil. Baron Vladmir Harkonnen is symblomatic of the wily Russians. The Desert foxes Fremen are representative of the native Saudi desert-dwelling Bedouin tribe who have a strongly tribe-oriented culture and undoubtedly value water in equal measure.

And the ultimate loser is the environment. Why do good books get over? It is also scary and prophetic. It is a reading experience that will leave you dreaming of the grave emptiness of Arrakis and make you wish you were there to brave it all in the privileged company of the noble Fremen.

Frank Herbert achieves the pinnacle of what a sci-fi author aspires to rise to; authentic world building. View all 45 comments.

I will admit there are some things that went over my head but for the most part I figured it out. I remember a billion and 65 years ago I watched the movie and was like what the?

Basically all I remember is Sting and sandworms. I would love to watch it again and see if I understand it more after reading the book. I'm still not sure what all the spices were about on Arrakis.

I keep thinking it's like their farming like we would farm corn or tobacco, etc. I could be wrong and I didn't get the connection between the spice and the sandworms.

Is it like a drug to them? I did read in the back of the book that is was like a drug when taken in small quantities and really addictive when taken in large quantities and that Muad'Did felt his prophesies were because of the spice.

I liked Duke Leto and I hated that he was betrayed not long after they got to Arrakis. There is always some twat out there causing trouble.

I really enjoyed Paul's character and his mother Jessica. They seemed like really strong people and adapted very well in everything they were put through.

I didn't really pay too much attention to the other characters or I guess I should say I didn't have many thoughts about them. With the exception of the ones that betrayed them.

I really enjoyed when Paul and Jessica had to travel to get away from the evil Baron Harkonnen before they were killed too. I don't know why, but I enjoyed their little journey.

I think they were both great in their roles when they were found by the Freman and showed they were a force to be reckoned with. Now maybe I'm getting this all wrong but I'm trying to tell it through the way I saw it in my mind.

I don't understand how Paul's sister, Alia, was an abomination. That one must have went over my head too. It might have had something to do with the poison Jessica took to become the Reverend Mother.

I would NOT was to live somewhere there was a water shortage. And the part where they were talking about selling foot water, I can't even.

Which basically means your stinky foot sweat! Overall I really liked the book. I enjoyed traipsing through this desert with Paul and his mother.

Only in book form though, not in real life! Since they are doing re-makes of about a million different movies, I wish they would re-make this one because I think it would be really awesome!

I would like to see this land come to life in today's time! I don't know if I'm going to continue with the series as I have heard this is the best one and the others get confusing.

But I would like to see how Paul is as a ruler and what all happens to them, or maybe not depending on what all happens. Does anyone have a link of where to get that book or is it still available?

View all 84 comments. No other single syllable means as much to the science fiction genre, a single word that conjures images of sandworms, spice wars, great battles between rival dynastic families and a massively detailed and intricately crafted universe.

No wonder this is widely regarded as not just a Science Fiction masterpiece, but a literary achievement as well. Like a study of Shakespeare, the reader finds that this is an archetype upon which many influences and imitators have based their works.

The comple Dune. The complexity and depth of the creation is staggering and I am continually astounded at the discipline with which Herbert must have focused his imagination.

This is the book upon which Herbert would base his greatest series and one that would outlive him as his son has continued to expand and add detail to the vast, immaculate tapestry woven by a true master of the genre.

Encapsulating political, economic, sociological, biological, cultural and dynastic themes, Frank Herbert has set a high standard for later practitioners.

From the perspective of having read his later 5 Dune sequels, I am astounded at the rich tapestry he has woven.

Most impressive was his close omnipresence, analyzing the thoughts and minute actions and subtle nuances of his complicated dynamic interplay of characters.

The exhaustive training of the Bene Gesserit and the intricate relations of the Houses and the Guild would stand as a monumental benchmark for speculative fiction ever since.

This time around I found myself looking more closely at the Harkonnens and will likely read some of Brian Herbert's additions to his fathers great work.

This time around I noticed that all of the quotes that begin chapters are from Princess Irulan and I paid close attention to how Herbert crafted these interludes.

I also was drawn to the religious undertones that really began very early in the book and how Paul realized his gifts and was preparing for his role in the beginning chapters - all demonstrating Herbert's great narrative skill.

Finally, I became more aware of what a great character was Gurney Halleck. While the ghola of Duncan Idaho dominated the later books, Herbert's creation of Halleck was an enjoyable and thought provoking addition to this masterpiece.

View all 85 comments. If this is the gold standard against which all science fiction must measure and be judged, let's just blow our brains out right now and call it a day.

As far as I can tell, Dune largely inspires two points of view. One marvels at its historical importance and world-building unique, fascinating, complex, rich , and the other dislikes the stilted writing but does so apologetically because Frank Herbert couldn't help the fact that he wrote science fiction in the s and that Edward Said hadn't d If this is the gold standard against which all science fiction must measure and be judged, let's just blow our brains out right now and call it a day.

One marvels at its historical importance and world-building unique, fascinating, complex, rich , and the other dislikes the stilted writing but does so apologetically because Frank Herbert couldn't help the fact that he wrote science fiction in the s and that Edward Said hadn't done his thing yet.

Come on , people of the world. Linear models of progress don't apply to good writing. Frank Herbert can't write because he's a shitty writer, not because it was the s.

The dialogue is clunky and characters have endless internal monologues in italics that serve no purpose but to explain incredibly obvious plot points to the reader.

This is an embarrassingly novice mistake. The plot also lacks any element of surprise. Princess Irulan, oblivious to the concept of spoiler alerts, summarizes all major plot points in her historical vignettes which introduce every single chapter.

We can't wonder about whether and how Jesus Christ Paul will become the messiah of the people because the princess has already told us before we've begun the book.

We can't wonder about who the traitor in the Atreides house is because Princess Irulan's vignette is all like "Yueh!

A million deaths were not enough for Yueh! It is So. Half the words are lifted from Arabic and Arab Fremen culture is the result of a scavenger rampage through Islamic concepts, scraps of Buddhism, and Frank Hebert's Orientalist curiosities all cobbled together into a cringe-inducing whole.

The main subject of this book, the sand niggers Fremen, have been in the desert for thousands of years, border on religious fanaticism, and haven't changed a bit over time.

They pray salat, conserve water because hello, desert , and wait for their white savior Paul to bring them out into the light or into the shade, as it were.

They frequently declare Muslim-sounding things in bastardized Arabic and are very upset because the Imperial forces are preventing them from doing Haj.

It's unclear how the Imperial forces have blocked all outbound flights to Saudi Arabia, but we'll take it on faith. There was a jihad situation, like, hundreds of years ago but it was apparently a jihad against computers?

I don't know. The ragheads Fremen also do this thing where two men will fight to the death and the winner will take the dead man's woman as his wife or his servant.

Given the history of the U. For a woman, the situation is reversed … The greatest peril to the Giver is the force that takes. The greatest peril to the Taker is the force that gives.

Mighty penis does the thrusting action. Woman has the sacred hole. Sacred hole is warm and open for mighty penis penetration.

Thanks for clearing that up, Frank. Male and female characters in this book align nicely with Frank's pole-in-hole view of the world.

The men do the war because the penis. The women do the manipulation and mind control because the vagina. They are either wives or concubines, and having children is of utmost important.

Man and his woman sometimes have tender conversations about all of this. Observe: "[Paul] began tightening his still suit. Anyway, let's talk some more about Paul, our white messiah.

When he's taking a break from tilling his fields, he's busy being a cartoon hero. He has no flaws. Like, none. He sees everything, understands everything, knows the future, and every word out of his mouth is prophetic and vaguely Shakespearean.

This is the kind of shit he says: [Re. Sit down and shut the fuck up. Nobody cares. Opposite the cartoon hero is the cartoon villain.

He's really, really evil. He wakes up evil, goes to bed evil, and all the time in the middle, he has evil conversations and evil thoughts.

Many of his evil thoughts are in italics so we know EXACTLY where the story is headed because plot twists are also evil and will not be tolerated.

Please note, he is also fat as fuck and eats a lot. Also, he's a big homo. And the homo's a pedo. I really have nothing more to say.

I AM glad I took the time to wade through this shitstorm of misogyny and orientalism. You can't read sci-fi and not have read Dune.

I always suspected I might hate it, but at least now I have proof. Luke Thank you for taking the words out of my mouth.

Oct 27, PM. I completely forgot about the pretentious reviews, thank you for reminding me so that I could imm Good God, now I remember why I uninstalled this app.

I completely forgot about the pretentious reviews, thank you for reminding me so that I could immediately uninstall.

They hated it before even opening the first page. This person is the personification of The Young Turks. A toxic cesspool of sin and misery.

As with most things that are universally worshipped by some and bitterly hated by others, the true quality is somewhere in the middle.

Not a glowing, flawless masterpiece as some would say and not a worthless one-star, derivative shitstorm like Jay screams it is.

Most things are more than the sum of their parts. Read the book if you want to. Jun 01, J. People often forget that this series is what innovated our modern concept of science fiction up until Neuromancer and The Martix, at least.

Dune took the Space Opera and asked if it might be more than spandex, dildo-shaped rockets, and scantily-clad green women.

Herbert created a vast and complex system of ancient spatial politics and peoples, then set them at one another's throats over land, money, and drugs.

Dune is often said to relate to Sci Fi in the same way that Tolkien relates to Fantas People often forget that this series is what innovated our modern concept of science fiction up until Neuromancer and The Martix, at least.

Dune is often said to relate to Sci Fi in the same way that Tolkien relates to Fantasy. I'd say that, as far as paradigm shift, this is widely true.

Both entered genres generally filled with the odd, childish, and ridiculous and injected a literary sensibility which affected all subsequent authors.

Few will challenge the importance of Star Wars' effect on film and storytelling in general, but without Dune, there would be no Star Wars. It is unfortunate that Lucas seems to have forgotten in these later years that his best genius was pilfered from Herbert, Campbell, and Kurosawa.

Though I have heard that the later books do not capture the same eclectic energy as the first, Dune itself is simply one of the most original and unusual pieces of Sci Fi ever written.

Read it, Starship Troopers, Ringworld, Neuromancer, and Snowcrash and you'll know everything you need to about Sci Fi: that you want more. View all 39 comments.

Shelves: transhumanism , sci-fi , space-opera , top-ten-w-cheats , fanboy-goes-squee , worldbuilding-sf , top-one-hundred. Number I shiver when Jessica consoles Chani.

I'm awestruck by the peaks and troughs of time, free-will, and the weakness in Paul even as he heroically strives against the evil that is about to be unleashed upon the universe.

Easily the number one book I've ever read. It's not just science fiction. It transcends science fiction, as a fascinating discussion of free-will versus inevitability.

Can the Jihad be denied? Can Paul ever really avoid his own death, despite seeing every time-line play out with him as the butt of every cosmic joke?

Can even cruelty or mercy even remain comprehensible after such knowledge? Yes, I think this work outdoes Nietzsche. It certainly does a great job of making us care about the question.

Is this all? Is this just a work that pays great justice to philosophy of action and inaction? Or is the novel merely a clever play at turning the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle into the physical embodiment of a man?

It is that, of course. The Kwisatz Haderach can be many places at once, and he can be both alive and dead at the same time just like that certain cat.

Is the novel a coming of age tale, first set as a mirror against his father Leto, only then to mirror the whole universe that had just turned against him?

Yes, of course. He was, after all, both the product of all his upbringing and his genes, embodying the question of nature versus nurture.

He was taught within many schools of martial arts and assassins, as well as training the mind in both the schools of the Mentats with their pure logic and that of the mystics, the Bene Gesserit, that allows complete control over the body down to the cellular level.

And if this training wasn't enough, he was deeply schooled in politics, leadership, and the meaning of loyalty. The boy was raised right. Of course, that is nothing without ninety generations of genetic bloodline tampering from the Bene Gesserit, right?

To become the fulcrum between cellular memory, tapping the minds and lives of all your genetic ancestors as well as tapping the ability to fold time and space, to become the eye of a storm of time.

What a damn brilliant setup for one tiny character, no? His training links to the unlocking of his genes and to the life-extending and enveloping spice, Melange, to make him not merely aware of time in a theoretical sense, but eventually to be unable to discern what was in the past, the present, or the future.

Here's a true Super-Man, well beyond Nietzsche. And don't believe for one second that this serious discussion about what would make a superior man makes for dull reading.

We've got PLOT that's probably some of the most exciting and visceral in all of literature, driving us right into the web of intrigue, vengeance, treachery, and galactic politics.

To quote the text, we've got "Plans within Plans," and it hardly stops there. We know the House Atreides is falling into a trap laid by the Emperor and House Harkonnen, and yet free-will and pride prevents any chance to avoid it.

The setup is brilliant and extremely political, giving us character sketches of some of the most brilliant and memorable characters of all time.

Duke Leto, the Red Duke, the most honorable and beloved leader. Duncan Idaho, the emotional and intuitive hero.

Gurney Halleck, archetypal loyalist and troubadour. Lady Jessica, the woman who ought to have had all honor in life, but was unjustly reviled and set aside for political necessity.

Chani being both her mirror and her eventual glory. And of course, my favorite character of all time, Paul Muad'dib Atreides, the one that would prevent the greater evils he foresaw, and went to enormous lengths and sacrifice to achieve, but who eventually failed in his task because even a god cannot overcome destiny.

Or the will of so many minds set as one. So damn brilliant. Frank Herbert spent five years writing this treasure, working and reworking it until he published it at age None of his other works come close to this masterpiece, and there's little wonder.

It was birthed, fully-formed, like Athena from Zeus's head, with enormous forethought and care. The worldbuilding was just as carefully formed, from the ecology of Arrakis and the life-cycles of the sandworms, to the history and the creation of the Fremen from their mild beginnings as Zensunni Wanderers, adherents to the Orange Catholic Bible, to their history of oppression so like those of those who are Jewish, to their settling and hardening of their bodies and souls in the wastes of Arrakis, also just like the Jewish who carved out a place for themselves in Israel.

Current politics aside, this was a very potent idea before when Herbert wrote this, and indeed, the core is still just as powerful when you turn it back to Muslims.

The Galactic culture is rich and detailed. The CHOAM economic consortium, with their monopoly on space travel and their need for the Spice to allow them to see a short period into the future to plot a safe course before folding space.

The Empire is caught on a knife's edge between a single power and every other House who sit in the possibility of putting aside all their squabbles for the sole purpose of checking the Emperor, if they so desired.

And Duke Atreides was such a possible popular leader among all the Great Houses, which was the primary reason the Emperor wanted him dead.

And of course, we have our Villains. The Baron Harkonnen has always been a crowd pleaser. Brilliant in his own right, devious and able to corrupt anyone with just the right sorts of pressure, including a certain absolutely trustworthy doctor we might mention.

The Tooth! Feyd Rautha Harkonnen is especially interesting for the question of nature versus nurture. The Bene Gesserit had intended him to mate with Paul, who should have been Leto and Jessica's daughter, and that offspring should have been the cumulation of ninety years of a breeding experiment to recreate the Kwisatz Haderach which had come about almost by accident during the Butlerian Jihad in the deep past, to overthrow the AI overlords.

He was practically Paul's genetic twin, or at least, his potential to be the "One who can be many places at once" was on par with Paul.

But instead of fulfilling the kind of destiny that we get with Paul, we see him grow up under the auspices of his Uncle the Baron, becoming as cruel and devious as he was deadly.

He was the argument of nurture in the conversation, of course, and having so very little of it eventually cost him his life.

I often wonder about the directions that Dune could have taken, all those little paths in time and circumstance that could have been. What if Feyd had been brought to Arrakis earlier and overwhelmed with Spice the way that Paul had?

Sure, he wouldn't have been able to convert the unconscious changes into conscious manipulation, but he might have had enough glimpses of the future, the way that the Fremen did, to have given him the edge he would have needed to kill Paul.

And then there's a relatively minor character, Hasimir Fenring, the Emperor's personal assassin, who was nearly the Kwisatz Haderach, himself.

Unable to breed true, he was still potent enough to be completely hidden to Paul's time-sight in the same way that Paul was hidden from the Spacing Guild's weaker time-sight.

His training as a skilled killer was also superior to Paul. He was, by all the hints and tricks in the tale, Paul's perfect downfall.

It always gives me shivers to think about, and it was only in a single instant of both recognition and pity from Paul that stayed Fenring from killing our hero.

Archived from the original on January 7, Retrieved February 14, New York: Routledge. Feb Oct Decoding Gender in Science Fiction.

New York: Routledge, Columbia: University of South Carolina Press. Spring The University of Texas at Brownsville. Retrieved March 26, — via oreilly.

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Archived from the original on January 12, Retrieved April 9, Today the novel is more popular than ever Retrieved January 26, — via Amazon.

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Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Retrieved 21 October October Volume 1, Issue 4.

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Dune (2020) Trailer #1 Dune Frank Herbert Der Wüstenplanet (Dune Chronicles, #1) [Herbert, Frank] on innocite.eu *​FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Der Wüstenplanet (Dune Chronicles, #1). Before The Matrix, before Star Wars, before Enders Game and Neuromancer, there was Dune: winner of the prestigious Hugo and Nebula awards, and widely​. dune frank herbert deutsch. Jasmin LambrechtThalia-Buchhandlung Rheine. Über weite Strecken sind die Romane von mystischen und philosophischen Reflexionen in Form von Dialogen oder inneren Monologen der Stahl Englisch geprägt. Zwischen den Handlungssträngen der einzelnen Bücher vergehen wiederum hunderte oder tausende von Jahren. In: The Guardian. In: Chicago Tribune. And whoever controls the spice controls the universe. Januar Robin Tunney Naked, abgerufen am Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Immer wieder spannend zu Orion Wilhelmshaven und in die Welt einzutauchen. Week-End Menschheit lebt in einem feudalistischen Imperium unter einem Padishah - Imperator und planetarischen Fürsten auf einer Vielzahl von Planetensystemen. Dune Frank Herbert Retrieved May 26, Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Throughout Paul's rise to superhuman status, he follows a plotline common to many stories describing the birth of a hero. Ludicrous, all of it, and the problems started with Neal Mcdonough butchery of so much of the novel that even the bones were scattered in no sensible pattern. Frank had sold two pulp adventure stories to magazines, one to Esquire and the other to Doc Savage. Each character feels a deep mixture of feelings for Paul who is boy, man, friend, soldier, sovereign, and Messiah and Haus Am Watt else.

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Frank Herbert - Dune T 1 - Partie 1 Mediathek Mdr Verpasste Sendung Miniserie wurde mit zwei Emmys für Kinematographie [24] und Visuelle Effekte [25] ausgezeichnet und für einen dritten Tonschnitt [26] nominiert. Die beschriebenen religiösen Denkfiguren lassen sich eher dem Islam als dem Christentum zuordnen. Für das gesamte Imperium hat die Melange fundamentale Bedeutung. Diese erkennen in ihm den lange vorhergesagten Die Unsterblichen Serie Netflix, und Paul rüstet sich zu einem gnadenlosen Rachefeldzug …. Eines Nerd Deutsch ersten bekannten Echtzeit-Strategiespiele. Ein Entzug kann zum Tod führen. Anderson für die weiteren Bücher verwendet.

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